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Timeline – Becky Ostil.

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Third year student Becky Ostil is currently working on a collage piece called Timeline.  She carefully curated several historical family photos and printed them digitally onto fabric. She is using traditional hand embroidery in addition to free machine embroidery to embellish the photos.

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One of a Kind Holiday 2014

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The One of a Kind show took place earlier this month.  The holiday show at Exhibition Place in Toronto and features over 800 exhibitors.

Some of the textile graduates from the Textile Studio at Sheridan College were amongst those exhibitors.

Katie Walker.

From her home studio in London, Ontario she creates wearable objects using fabrics she has designed and screen printed.

Katie Walker Designs

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Hatchetmade.

2012 graduate Christina Obouch creates interiors and accessory products in her home studio in Hamilton.  Shown are her screen printed pouches.

Check out her website and online store here.

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Anu Raina.

Anu Raina graduated from the program in 2010. She is a designer and artist from Toronto. Her work is original, artsy, chic and proudly Made in Canada.

To see more of her work click here .


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Art of Karuna.

Kalyna Pidwerbesky graduated in 1999. She is a Toronto-based textile artisan who creates original handworked textile mixed media art and wearable art.

To see more of her work: Art of Karuna.

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Holiday Textile Sale

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Tomorrow is the Holiday Textile Sale at the college.  The students have some fantastic products for sale this time around.  Don’t miss it!  Shop handmade this holiday and support the students.

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Bloom

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Thea Haines and Uta Riccius
Bloom
Curated by Kearon Roy Taylor

October 24th to November 29th, 2014.
Opening reception: Friday, November 14. (7:00 to 10:00 p.m.)

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BLOOM is a Wunderkammer of industrial ecology.
Explorations into locally derived textile dyeing and shells of fauna cast from consumer packaging call us to reevaluate our relationship to the manufactured. Thea Haines and Uta Riccius trace obverse paths that examine industry as both embodied craft and geological force. Their systematic taxonomy of production and consumption converges on a rich ecology that catalogues the phylogeny of mass-produced objects and asks: Can we bring our habits and desires back down to earth and realize an economy that is not decoupled from ecology, or are we going to be identified by the mountains of excess we have left behind?

BLOOM is a Wunderkammer of industrial ecology.
Explorations into locally derived textile dyeing and shells of fauna cast from consumer packaging call us to reevaluate our relationship to the manufactured. Thea Haines and Uta Riccius trace obverse paths that examine industry as both embodied craft and geological force. Their systematic taxonomy of production and consumption converges on a rich ecology that catalogues the phylogeny of mass-produced objects and asks: Can we bring our habits and desires back down to earth and realize an economy that is not decoupled from ecology, or are we going to be identified by the mountains of excess we have left behind?

Thea Haines is an artist, textile designer, and curator. She holds an MA in Textile Design from Chel-sea College of Art and Design, London, and was previously artist-in-residence in the Craft Studio at Harbourfront Centre, and a member of the Contemporary Textile Studio Co-operative at 401 Rich-mond. She lives and works in downtown Hamilton. cargocollective.com/theahaines

Uta Riccius. Having studied at Concordia University (BFA) and at Universität der Künste in Berlin (MFA), she has exhibited in Canada, Mexico and Germany. Her current work explores digital print media of plaster cast sculptures using recycled plastic packaging. www.utariccius.com

Kearon Roy Taylor is a printmaker and media artist. A founding member of the Hamilton Audio Vis-ual Node (HAVN), he recently received Emerging Artist Awards in Media and Visual Arts at the Hamilton Arts Awards (2014). He is currently working towards a Master of Architecture at the University of Toronto. www.krtkrt.ca

Botanica Tinctoria

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Last month Botanica Tinctoria officially launched in Toronto.  The beautiful line of products includes trimmings and threads in a range of colours.  These trims such as ribbons, rick rack and embroidery thread are all dyed using natural materials such as indigo and madder.

According to the Botanica Tinctoria website, “Reviving historical practices and implementing current environmental ideas, both organic and conventional cotton trimmings are dyed with BioDye India in a closed loop process. BioDye uses dyes, mordants and auxiliaries that are environmentally safe. Dyestuffs are obtained from sustainable sources such as leaves, fruits, by-products and regnerative stems, and all waste materials are biodegradable. In fact, waste products, including compost and irrigation-quality water, are used to grow dye and medicinal plants and food crops for in-house consumption. Through collaboration with village women’s groups, dyeplants are collected and firewood is obtained from renewable plantations and then used in fuel-efficient stoves in the dye house. BioDye also works with local farmers to support the re-introduction of indigo in agriculturally depleted regions, thus contributing to sustainable livelihoods.”

The line is available for purchase at the workroom.ca and botanicatinctoria.com.

Sheridan College faculty member Thea Haines was at the launch and took these pictures.

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Botanica Tinctoria is the project of former Sheridan Textile Studio head Rachel MacHenry.  She is working on developing a fantastic group of block printed ribbons that will be added to the line in the future.

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Second Year Students – Printing Project.

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The second year students were inspired by the beautiful textiles at the Textile Museum of Canada in Toronto after a recent field trip.
Their teacher assigned them the task of creating a print based on sketches completed while at the museum. Their final prints were very diverse and utilized a variety of techniques.  These photos represent some of the works in progress.

Visiting Artist: Jennifer Maramba

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Join us for an artist talk with Jennifer Maramba on Tuesday, October 28 at 11:15am.  It will take place in the Textile Studio Room AA04.

Jennifer will present contemporary T’nalak textiles. Through both images and video she will show the process of the T’nalak, the sacred cloth of the T’boli peoples.

In addition to traditional and contemporary T’nalak textiles, Jennifer will also present dyed abaca fibre samples, Loom of Buwat (Barbara Fanuy Kibed), and Ye Kemu – a textile created by Barbara Fanuy Kibed.

BIO

Jennifer Maramba is an Arts Educator in Philippines Indigenous Traditions. She is also a multi- disciplinary artist. Jennifer is a member of the Kapwa Collective, a group of Filipino Canadian artists, critical thinkers, and healers who work towards bridging narratives between the Indigenous and the Diasporic, and the Filipino and Canadian. The Kapwa Collective facilitates links among academic, artistic, activist, and other communities in Toronto.

www. kapwacollective.com

To see more of Jennifer Maramba’s work: jennifermaramba.wordpress.com

The T’boli people are indigenous to the southern regions of the Philippines in Lake Sebu of South Cotabato.

T’nalak are patterns dreamed through the process of dream weaving. They are passed down from the designer and/or weaver’s ancestors or through Fu Dalu, the spirit of the abaca plant.

Poster Jen Maramba